Neon Nude

Book By: Kay Rhoads
Play #: 8398
Pages: 32 pgs
Cast: 4 m, 4 w

Friendships are tried, prejudice revealed, and self-interest is (dare it be said) exposed, in this fast-moving comedy. A small Iowa town must deal with the weighty issue of whether a stone statue violates the morals ordinance. Chorlis Deets, longtime resident of Lamb’s Corner, has a new lawn ornament in honor of his departed wife...a stone statue of Aphrodite...painted pink and “situated” on a swing in his front yard. An emergency meeting of the city council is called to debate the issue and decide whether or not to forcibly remove the statue. As the meeting courses through the afternoon everyone has their say. The problem must be resolved quickly because on the heels of Aphrodite, on backorder from Belgium, Chorlis awaits the arrival of a stone naked Adonis. But before the issue is settled word comes that Aphrodite has been stolen! (A larger cast version of this play is available entitled “The Stone Naked Woman.”)

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Productions

Behind The Scenes

PLAYWRIGHT KAY PHOADS TALKS ABOUT “NEON NUDE”

 

Q: WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO WRITE THIS PLAY?

A: Stories told by a friend who serves on the city council of a town so small that the notice of the meeting is tacked to the outhouse in the town park and a story in the “Des Moines Register” some years back about whether a statue placed in a resident's yard was art or an obscenity.

 

Q: WHAT'S YOUR FAVORITE PART OR LINE IN THE PLAY? WHY?

A: A rather “throw away” line that depicts such innocence on the part of the character: “Webb walked.” It doesn’t move the play forward or explain the actions. It’s one of those tiny lines that tell so much about a character.

 

Q: WHAT DID YOU TRY TO ACHIEVE WITH THIS PLAY?

A: How such seriousness to duty can result in such comedy…for any of us…playwrights included.